The W: A Weekly Reading List

In this week’s edition…bitcoin-mania…why the Libyan slave trade…what’s next for iPod’s co-inventor…you’ve bought a $450M da Vinci painting, now what…what tech world did you grow up in…and more.     Business & Economics It just got real. In many ways, Bitcoin represents the perfect mania – as there are zero cashflows or dividends or earnings

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HBR: “Your Strategy Should Be a Hypothesis You Constantly Adjust”

Just read a good short post on strategy as hypothesis on HBR.com by Amy Edmondson and Paul Verdin. Some highlights:   An alternative perspective on strategy and execution — one that we argue is more in tune with the nature of value creation in a world marked by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA) — conceives of

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The Algorithm Manager Is Here. Artificial Empathy Is Next.

Last year I wrote a post about a future in which work is dominated more and more by non-human agents. To accompany the article I used a photo from a TV show about robot workers, which is pretty much what most people think about when they contemplate machines replacing workers. However, the reality is that

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Capital, Labor or Talent: Which One Are You?

It’s not often that you read an article about labor theory that really clarifies a wider economic issue, but Roger L. Martin’s recent piece in HBR on the NFL’s kneeling issue does just that. Martin argues that the reason the NFL owners have not pushed the players very hard to stop their protests, even though

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Stanford GSB: “How to Stop White-Collar Crime”

Very good, short, recap of Judge Jed Rakoff’s views on what really deters corporate crime on the Stanford GSB site:   What incentive would work to change corporate behavior? The threat of prison, says Rakoff. “I found that to a person, [executives accused of white-collar crimes] feared prison, and they feared it mightily. They would

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Prospect: “How I learnt to loathe England”

Prospect magazine has a devastating op-ed by Joris Luyendijk on his experience as a Dutchman living in the U.K. during the time of Brexit. It’s well worth a read. Some highlights:  The Dutch and the British have a lot in common, at first sight. Sea-faring nations with a long and guilty history of colonial occupation

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FT: “Would you pay for an ethical search engine?”

Don’t miss Jonathan Margoli’s short FT piece on whether consumer would pay for a private search engine or e-mail service. I know I would… Some highlights: I asked two of them if this liking was to their liking. The BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones appeared to “like” the New York Times. Is this so, I

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What’s the Future of Work? The Shift Commission Gives Us Four Alternatives To Consider

I have spent a lot of my time in 2017 talking to various experts in many fields about the future of work and how that future may impact our society in the future. One of the most insightful items I have come across this year is a report called Shift: e Commission on Work, Workers, and

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