Tag: Stanford

The Algorithm Manager Is Here. Artificial Empathy Is Next.

Last year I wrote a post about a future in which work is dominated more and more by non-human agents. To accompany the article I used a photo from a TV show about robot workers, which is pretty much what most people think about when they contemplate machines replacing workers. However, the reality is that

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Stanford GSB: “How to Stop White-Collar Crime”

Very good, short, recap of Judge Jed Rakoff’s views on what really deters corporate crime on the Stanford GSB site:   What incentive would work to change corporate behavior? The threat of prison, says Rakoff. “I found that to a person, [executives accused of white-collar crimes] feared prison, and they feared it mightily. They would

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Recent Read: “Searching for Steve Jobs: Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, and the Dangers of the Origin Story”

I just finished readingAlexander Mallery’s paper on “protective ignorance” in Stanford Intersect. It’s an interesting take on the Elizabeth Holmes/Steve Jobs connection and how it may have shielded her and her company from scrutiny. Some highlights:   Holmes, thus, did not just copy the Jobs story—she improved upon it. Jobs dropped out of Reed College

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Are We Running Out of Innovation?

I come across a lot of interesting writing in my work, but I have to note that one of the most thought-provoking scholarly pieces I have read recently is the working paper published earlier this year by Nicholas Bloom, Charles I. Jones, Michael Webb (all Stanford) and John Van Reenen (MIT). Their paper is entitled, Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?, and both the question they pose

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