Tag: HBR

HBR: The First Wave of Corporate AI Is Doomed to Fail

There is a good, short, read by Kartik Hosanagar and Apoorv Saxena on hbr.com on why the first wave of AI efforts are bound to fail. Some highlights:     We believe that a similar story of early failures leading to irrational retreats will occur with AI. Already, evidence suggests that early AI pilots are unlikely to produce the dramatic

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HBR: How Likely Is Your Industry to Be Disrupted? This 2×2 Matrix Will Tell You

Thought-provoking strategy piece on HBR.org is worth a read. Some highlights: To help business leaders better understand industry disruption, we developed an index that measures an industry’s current level of disruption as well as its susceptibility to future disruption. For the former, we examined the presence and market penetration of disruptor companies; we also considered

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HBR: “Your Strategy Should Be a Hypothesis You Constantly Adjust”

Just read a good short post on strategy as hypothesis on HBR.com by Amy Edmondson and Paul Verdin. Some highlights:   An alternative perspective on strategy and execution — one that we argue is more in tune with the nature of value creation in a world marked by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA) — conceives of

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Capital, Labor or Talent: Which One Are You?

It’s not often that you read an article about labor theory that really clarifies a wider economic issue, but Roger L. Martin’s recent piece in HBR on the NFL’s kneeling issue does just that. Martin argues that the reason the NFL owners have not pushed the players very hard to stop their protests, even though

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Recent Read: “What BMW’s Corporate VC Offers That Regular Investors Can’t”

In case you missed it, HBR.com has a good piece on BMW’s “venture client” corporate VC model that’s worth the time to read. Some highlights:   Based on his own experience, a reading of the emerging research, and dozens of conversations, Gimmy was convinced that the innovation impact of corporate VCs had been disappointing not

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The Great De-Equitization Is On, But Is That A Good Thing?

Among all the talk of globalization and trade tariffs, a seismic shift in capitalism is taking place without, it seems, much public debate. Little by little, the idea that public companies, and wide-spread individual stock ownership, are a necessary and vital part of a capitalist system is dying a slow and quiet death. As a Wall Street Journal  recently noted:

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What’s Disruptive Innovation? The Idea’s Creators Think Your Answer Is Probably Wrong.

The latest issue of the Harvard Business Review contains a very interesting debate currently taking place between Clayton M. Christensen, one of the originators (along with Joseph L. Bowers in a 1995 HBR article) of Disruption Theory  (“DT”), and some HBR readers. It’s actually quite a relevant discussion, since the concept of disruption has become such an ubiquitous and influential idea in business. Christensen’s (and his co-authors Michael

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