Tag: HBR

HBR: “Your Strategy Should Be a Hypothesis You Constantly Adjust”

Just read a good short post on strategy as hypothesis on HBR.com by Amy Edmondson and Paul Verdin. Some highlights:   An alternative perspective on strategy and execution — one that we argue is more in tune with the nature of value creation in a world marked by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA) — conceives of

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Recent Read: “What BMW’s Corporate VC Offers That Regular Investors Can’t”

In case you missed it, HBR.com has a good piece on BMW’s “venture client” corporate VC model that’s worth the time to read. Some highlights:   Based on his own experience, a reading of the emerging research, and dozens of conversations, Gimmy was convinced that the innovation impact of corporate VCs had been disappointing not

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The Great De-Equitization Is On, But Is That A Good Thing?

Among all the talk of globalization and trade tariffs, a seismic shift in capitalism is taking place without, it seems, much public debate. Little by little, the idea that public companies, and wide-spread individual stock ownership, are a necessary and vital part of a capitalist system is dying a slow and quiet death. As a Wall Street Journal  recently noted:

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What’s Disruptive Innovation? The Idea’s Creators Think Your Answer Is Probably Wrong.

The latest issue of the Harvard Business Review contains a very interesting debate currently taking place between Clayton M. Christensen, one of the originators (along with Joseph L. Bowers in a 1995 HBR article) of Disruption Theory  (“DT”), and some HBR readers. It’s actually quite a relevant discussion, since the concept of disruption has become such an ubiquitous and influential idea in business. Christensen’s (and his co-authors Michael

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HBR.com: “Why Quants Should Manage Your Supply Chain Risk”

I just posted a new piece on HBR.com on SC Risk. It’s a short summary of my point of view on how SCRM needs to change its approach radically. Read full post here: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/11/why_quants_should_manage_your.html?referral=00563&cm_mmc=email-_-newsletter-_-daily_alert-_-alert_date&utm_source=newsletter_daily_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert_date

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