FT: “Winners and losers in the sharing economy”

Good piece by Brooke Masters on FT about the strategic implications of the sharing economy. Some highlights: Streaming is at the forefront of a trend that threatens to upend a much wider range of industries. Technology-based groups are encouraging consumers to rethink their approach to everything from textbooks and party dresses to housing and transportation.

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Cross-Device Tracking Makes Our Online History the Ghost of Christmas Past, Present and Future

Like many of you, my company had a Holiday Party, and about two weeks before the happy event my wife was on line shopping for a dress. She soon found one and asked me over to her computer to look it over. I did and thought nothing of the event until twenty-four hours later when,

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WIRED: “INSIDE CHINA’S VAST NEW EXPERIMENT IN SOCIAL RANKING”

Don’t miss Mara Hvistendah’s excellent piece on China’s Zhima social credit system on WIRED. Some highlights:   If you live in the United States, you are by now accustomed to relinquishing your data to corporations. Credit card companies know when you run up bar tabs or buy sex toys. Facebook knows if you like Tasty

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HBR: “Your Strategy Should Be a Hypothesis You Constantly Adjust”

Just read a good short post on strategy as hypothesis on HBR.com by Amy Edmondson and Paul Verdin. Some highlights:   An alternative perspective on strategy and execution — one that we argue is more in tune with the nature of value creation in a world marked by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity (VUCA) — conceives of

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The Algorithm Manager Is Here. Artificial Empathy Is Next.

Last year I wrote a post about a future in which work is dominated more and more by non-human agents. To accompany the article I used a photo from a TV show about robot workers, which is pretty much what most people think about when they contemplate machines replacing workers. However, the reality is that

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Capital, Labor or Talent: Which One Are You?

It’s not often that you read an article about labor theory that really clarifies a wider economic issue, but Roger L. Martin’s recent piece in HBR on the NFL’s kneeling issue does just that. Martin argues that the reason the NFL owners have not pushed the players very hard to stop their protests, even though

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Stanford GSB: “How to Stop White-Collar Crime”

Very good, short, recap of Judge Jed Rakoff’s views on what really deters corporate crime on the Stanford GSB site:   What incentive would work to change corporate behavior? The threat of prison, says Rakoff. “I found that to a person, [executives accused of white-collar crimes] feared prison, and they feared it mightily. They would

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Prospect: “How I learnt to loathe England”

Prospect magazine has a devastating op-ed by Joris Luyendijk on his experience as a Dutchman living in the U.K. during the time of Brexit. It’s well worth a read. Some highlights:  The Dutch and the British have a lot in common, at first sight. Sea-faring nations with a long and guilty history of colonial occupation

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