Category: Regulations

Recent Read: “The Information War Is On. Are We Ready For It?”

Don’t miss this piece by Renee DiResta (Director of research at New Knowledge, and a Mozilla fellow on media, misinformation and trust) on Wired about the extent of the misinformation problem on the internet today. Some highlights:   But, ultimately, what the government—and the general public—is realizing is that while disinformation, misinformation, and social media hoaxes

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Corporations Must Take a New Look at Data Privacy

Over the course of the past month or so, I have been interviewing World 50 members and expert advisors on the changing nature of the data privacy issue. After many hours of discussion with people who spend their professional lives thinking and working in this space, I have come to a few critical conclusions about

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Will CEO Pay Ratio Be 2018’s Most Discussed Business Metric?

Back in 2015 a new provision of the Dodd-Frank law was approved stipulating that U.S. companies had to start disclosing the pay gap between their top boss and regular employees, i.e., the “CEO pay ratio.” This provision wasn’t discussed very much at the time, and there was debate in 2016 about how to actually measure and

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FT: Big Tech should hit the reset button

In case you missed it, there is a good piece on FT.com on how tech companies are mis-managing the rising discontent with their power written by Rana Faroohar. Some highlights: The Fangs — Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google — are having a crisis that encompasses the cognitive, the political and the economic. Activists, regulators and even some

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Stanford GSB: “How to Stop White-Collar Crime”

Very good, short, recap of Judge Jed Rakoff’s views on what really deters corporate crime on the Stanford GSB site:   What incentive would work to change corporate behavior? The threat of prison, says Rakoff. “I found that to a person, [executives accused of white-collar crimes] feared prison, and they feared it mightily. They would

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It’s Time to Put The Credit Bureaus Out of Business

Like 142.9+ million other U.S. consumers, my data was stolen from Equifax’s computers recently. Having been the (thankfully brief) victim of identify theft years ago, I can only hope that we all don’t suffer too much from Equifax’s carelessness with our data. As so many other commentators have noted, they have only one job to

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Wharton: “Why Corrupt Executives Are Rarely Prosecuted”

Don’t miss a great Knowledge@Wharton interview with Jesse Eisinger on his new book, The Chickenshit Club. Some highlights: Jesse Eisinger: The Justice Department has lost the will and ability to prosecute top corporate executives. They focus on settlements with corporations for money, and I think this undermines justice in America. Knowledge@Wharton: They lost the will. That’s

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Should London Change How We Think About Free Speech Online?

Last week terrorists once again attacked the people of London. Lives were shattered and lost yet again, and as such the nation’s leadership was forced to respond to the continuing threat that terrorists post to open societies. Leading the charge, the U.K.’s Prime Minister, Theresa May, decided to place a large part of the blame

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Microsoft’s President Makes the Case For A “Digital Geneva Convention”

In case you missed it, Microsoft’s Brad Smith makes an interesting suggestion in MIT Tech Review for a “Geneva” convention on cyber-security, and idea I have floated in our Security 50 CISO forum. Some excerpts: In recent years, computing and security companies have uncovered or been the victims of malware and network attacks that appear linked with military

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