Category: Economics

It’s Time to Put The Credit Bureaus Out of Business

Like 142.9+ million other U.S. consumers, my data was stolen from Equifax’s computers recently. Having been the (thankfully brief) victim of identify theft years ago, I can only hope that we all don’t suffer too much from Equifax’s carelessness with our data. As so many other commentators have noted, they have only one job to

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The W: A Weekly Reading List

In this week’s edition… the dream of nationless cities at sea…why Americans should learn the Chinese way… the lonely future of buying stuff…how science is unlocking the secrets of addiction…cinematography is finally capturing all shades…and more. Have a great weekend!   Business & Economics Investors Prefer It When Corporations Are Specific about the Risk They

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FT: “Stanley Fischer’s departure reveals weakness at the Fed”

There is an excellent analysis of Stanley Fischer’s departure from the Fed on ft.com. Some highlights: The early resignation of Stanley Fischer, the Federal Reserve board vice-chairman, is a reminder that the coming turnover in the Fed’s leadership is unprecedented in speed and scale. For all the attacks on the Fed since 2008 nothing has

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Recent Read: “What BMW’s Corporate VC Offers That Regular Investors Can’t”

In case you missed it, HBR.com has a good piece on BMW’s “venture client” corporate VC model that’s worth the time to read. Some highlights:   Based on his own experience, a reading of the emerging research, and dozens of conversations, Gimmy was convinced that the innovation impact of corporate VCs had been disappointing not

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Bloomberg: “Why Aren’t American Teenagers Working Anymore?”

Good piece on Bloomberg about why teenagers in the U.S. are working fewer summer jobs. Some excerpts: For Baby Boomers and Generation X, the summer job was a rite of passage. Today’s teenagers have other priorities. Teens are likeliest to be working in July, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that’s not seasonally

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Are We Running Out of Innovation?

I come across a lot of interesting writing in my work, but I have to note that one of the most thought-provoking scholarly pieces I have read recently is the working paper published earlier this year by Nicholas Bloom, Charles I. Jones, Michael Webb (all Stanford) and John Van Reenen (MIT). Their paper is entitled, Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?, and both the question they pose

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