Month: February 2017

NY Times: “Learning to Love Our Robot Co-Workers”

In case you missed it, the NY Times recently ran an interesting piece by Kim Tingley on working alongside robots. Some excerpts:    The more I talked with engineers and civilians alike, the more I came to believe that this feeling was hardly unusual and that it went beyond the perfectly rational fear that a robot might take your

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The “Big Government” Workforce Is Not What We Think It Is

One of the major recurring themes in American society for the past few decades has been that “the federal government is too big” and that we need to “shrink the number of bureaucrats” in America. While endless words have been written along such lines, it’s rare that someone actually takes the time to sort through the facts of what is,

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Silicon Valley’s Startup Autopsy Reports Make For Interesting Reading

One of the more memorable books I’ve read is called Dead Men Do Tell Tales, in which Dr. William Maples takes you inside the world of forensic medicine. As the book points out, you can learn a lot from the dead, which is why one of my favorite web pages to browse is CB Insight’s startup post-mostem page. From cash

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Microsoft’s President Makes the Case For A “Digital Geneva Convention”

In case you missed it, Microsoft’s Brad Smith makes an interesting suggestion in MIT Tech Review for a “Geneva” convention on cyber-security, and idea I have floated in our Security 50 CISO forum. Some excerpts: In recent years, computing and security companies have uncovered or been the victims of malware and network attacks that appear linked with military

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PS: Trump’s Anachronistic Trade Strategy

In case you missed it, there is a good post on Project Syndicate by Richard Baldwin on the Trump team’s misreading of the unemployment problem. An excerpt: Trump and his team are missing a simple point: twenty-first-century globalization is knowledge-led, not trade-led. Radically reduced communication costs have enabled US firms to move production to lower-wage countries.

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